Posts Tagged ‘marketing plan’

Writing Wednesday/ Marketing Part 1

 

WRITING WEDNESDAY

Typewriter Pink

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

On Wednesday’s I like to share information I picked up on my path to publishing, marketing and preparing to publish again. Information that I wish someone would have shared with me, back then.

 

 

This week’s topic is Marketing Part 1

No matter where you are with your writing, even if you are just starting out, whether you are self, independently or traditionally published, marketing should be on your mind very early on in your process.

Back here I wrote about writing proposals.

https://doreenmcgettigan.com/?p=5141

An important part of your proposal is the Marketing Plan.

Marketing is the process for creating, communicating, selling and delivering your product (book) to customers and for managing customer (reader) relationships in ways that benefit. It requires co-ordination, planning and implementation.

Before starting your plan you will need to establish your goals, determine your target audience, research competition, ad costs, consider strategies, a time table and a budget.

Keep in mind when planning your timetable that most print publications (other than newspapers) require a long lead time for placing ads. Some magazines are laid out months in advance of their publication date. Internet banner ads can sometimes have a long lead time too. Radio and T.V. producers book guest well in advance. Most book stores schedule readings and book signing’s well ahead of time as well. Conferences book speakers and presenters months in advance.

Advertising is one component of marketing. It is the paid communication about your book through direct mail, print media, radio, television and the internet. An integral part of marketing, advertising is the process used to motivate buyers. Advertising can be expensive. It takes diligent research to come up with advertising outlets that reach your target audience and fit your budget.

Newspaper photo

When considering your marketing budget remember to include promotional materials like business cards, postcards, postage, bookmarkers and other promotional items, advertising, travel a launch party, web site, and professional organization memberships to name a few. If you are publishing with a traditional or an Indy publisher they may cover some of advertising cost, chances are the bulk of it will be up to you. Some authors self-publish and feel they can skip the advertising step. They say, “I cannot afford it.” To this I say publishing is a business. It is absolutely possible to sell books without advertising, most likely one at a time. One, well placed add can sell hundreds.

Public Relations (PR) is the professional action that presents you and your book to the public, stores, and the media including social media in the best possible light and managing the spread of the information about you and your book. These actions also include writing press releases, pitches to T.V. and radio producers, event management, creating and producing promotional materials.

And you thought writing the book was the hardest part didn’t you? Don’t get discouraged. Marketing is a bear, for sure but the key is a good, well researched, well implemented, realistic plan.

Start with a tag line. When someone ask you what your book is about you want a two- to- three sentence answer to roll off of your lips without sounding memorized. It is a good idea to have two or three taglines you can use. Practice saying it out loud until it sounds natural.

Next week I will write in more detail about PR.

 

  • 5000 copies of a hardcover book in one week, depending on the month could land your book on the New York Times top 15 list/
  • 250-500 is the average number of books sold by first time authors.
  • Once again because it is one of my favorites, the average age of a best-selling author is 50.
  • The number of books being published every year is exploding. On average 1,000,000 books are published in the United States each year. Hundreds of thousands of American language books are sold in other countries.

The only thing standing between you and your goal..

Marketing 101–Part 1

Now What?

You wrote the book and did all the right things to make it the best it can possibly be …now what?

No matter which publishing path you chose, self, independent or traditional, most likely you will be the one responsible for the marketing of your work.

What exactly is Marketing?

Read the rest of this entry »

Subscribe/Follow
Enter your Email:
Preview | Powered by FeedBlitz