Posts Tagged ‘book proposal’

Seriously, a proposal…

WritingWednesday

Typewriter Pink

 

Wednesday is the day I share what I have learned on my journey from writing to publication, marketing and writing and publishing again. If you have any questions please feel free to leave them in the comments and I will do my best to answer them. If you have any tips please share them with us…

Proposals

 A proposal is a business plan for your book. If you write nonfiction and query an agent that agent may ask to see your proposal. More and more agents that represent fiction are asking for one as well. It is a good idea to have one prepared before you start to query.

When I started querying for my first book I had no idea what a proposal was. I was so excited to get a response from the third agent I queried but when she asked for a proposal, I had no clue. Needless to say the one I hurried to put together got me nowhere. This time around I wrote the proposal before I wrote the book.

Quote Never Give Up

  • It contains a cover page with word count, genre, title, short description of the book and your contact information.
  • A table of contents
  • A one page summary (the synopsis) of your book. Think of what might be on the back cover of the book.
  • Target Audience. Who will buy this book and why. Do not ever say everyone will love this book because they won’t. Pick a specific demographic and then two sub demographics.
  • Research the competition. What titles out there are similar to yours? Remember that competition in the book world is a very good thing. If there are numerous titles that means there is consumer interest. Agents and Publishers love competition. List these books and explain why they are similar and why they are different. Why is your book better?
  • Your Platform- how you will be able to reach your target audience (where you are on line, your church, groups or organizations you belong to, connections etc…)
  • Detailed Author Bio- Who you are and why you are the best person to tell this story and the best person to promote the book. Include resume information.
  • Your marketing and promotion plan. Only list what you know you can do not what you hope to do. Example: Do not say I will appear on Oprah’s show and she will love my book unless you know for a fact you can make that happen. Make your plan concrete and include numbers. The secret to creating this plan is not how many ideas you have but how many connections you have and the action steps you are willing to take to improve your presence.
  • Chapter Outline with a brief description of each chapter.
  • Sample chapters- Choose two or three of your absolute best chapters (complete)
  • Have several people including your editor go over your proposal.

 

Quote Start Somewhere

Happy Writing,

Doreen

 

 

Writing Wednesday/ Marketing Part 1

 

WRITING WEDNESDAY

Typewriter Pink

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

On Wednesday’s I like to share information I picked up on my path to publishing, marketing and preparing to publish again. Information that I wish someone would have shared with me, back then.

 

 

This week’s topic is Marketing Part 1

No matter where you are with your writing, even if you are just starting out, whether you are self, independently or traditionally published, marketing should be on your mind very early on in your process.

Back here I wrote about writing proposals.

https://doreenmcgettigan.com/?p=5141

An important part of your proposal is the Marketing Plan.

Marketing is the process for creating, communicating, selling and delivering your product (book) to customers and for managing customer (reader) relationships in ways that benefit. It requires co-ordination, planning and implementation.

Before starting your plan you will need to establish your goals, determine your target audience, research competition, ad costs, consider strategies, a time table and a budget.

Keep in mind when planning your timetable that most print publications (other than newspapers) require a long lead time for placing ads. Some magazines are laid out months in advance of their publication date. Internet banner ads can sometimes have a long lead time too. Radio and T.V. producers book guest well in advance. Most book stores schedule readings and book signing’s well ahead of time as well. Conferences book speakers and presenters months in advance.

Advertising is one component of marketing. It is the paid communication about your book through direct mail, print media, radio, television and the internet. An integral part of marketing, advertising is the process used to motivate buyers. Advertising can be expensive. It takes diligent research to come up with advertising outlets that reach your target audience and fit your budget.

Newspaper photo

When considering your marketing budget remember to include promotional materials like business cards, postcards, postage, bookmarkers and other promotional items, advertising, travel a launch party, web site, and professional organization memberships to name a few. If you are publishing with a traditional or an Indy publisher they may cover some of advertising cost, chances are the bulk of it will be up to you. Some authors self-publish and feel they can skip the advertising step. They say, “I cannot afford it.” To this I say publishing is a business. It is absolutely possible to sell books without advertising, most likely one at a time. One, well placed add can sell hundreds.

Public Relations (PR) is the professional action that presents you and your book to the public, stores, and the media including social media in the best possible light and managing the spread of the information about you and your book. These actions also include writing press releases, pitches to T.V. and radio producers, event management, creating and producing promotional materials.

And you thought writing the book was the hardest part didn’t you? Don’t get discouraged. Marketing is a bear, for sure but the key is a good, well researched, well implemented, realistic plan.

Start with a tag line. When someone ask you what your book is about you want a two- to- three sentence answer to roll off of your lips without sounding memorized. It is a good idea to have two or three taglines you can use. Practice saying it out loud until it sounds natural.

Next week I will write in more detail about PR.

 

  • 5000 copies of a hardcover book in one week, depending on the month could land your book on the New York Times top 15 list/
  • 250-500 is the average number of books sold by first time authors.
  • Once again because it is one of my favorites, the average age of a best-selling author is 50.
  • The number of books being published every year is exploding. On average 1,000,000 books are published in the United States each year. Hundreds of thousands of American language books are sold in other countries.

The only thing standing between you and your goal..

Thats right I am Insecure #IWSG and Do you have a rant to share?

September always signals to me that it is time to stop goofing off and to get serious. This must carry over from childhood or actually well into adulthood when September was all about school.

I actually did not do too poorly over the summer. I did a lot of writing but now I have some serious deadlines coming up. I have a lot of polishing to do.

Is it possible to be feeling very insecure and feeling very confident at the same time?  Dumb question because that is exactly how I have been feeling. I am so glad it is time for…

                                   The Insecure Writer’s Support Group

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